Tips for students appearing for Exams

Pen n Personality

STUDENTS: –

Handwriting is a reflection of your personality. Check it out!!

Ever since we were babies, we had the basic instinct for adventure to explore something new. As a result we have ended up doing ‘n’ number of things.

When we were given a substance – a pencil to write with, we all started with scribbling and drawing on the walls. Gradually, we picked up writing alphabets and then forming sentences and so on.

Now that we have outgrown these phases and have known our own personality to some extent we can analyze ourself through our handwriting.

Times have changed and thereby we have difficult and complicated tasks to be taken care of in our day today routines. This leaves us with very less time to look into ourselves and try to sit back and think what are our actual goals, which we have to achieve.

Here are few tips, which can give you an insight to help yourself to be a better individual.

(1) Over aggressive tendencies: –

These are shown as in extreme forward slant, angular letter forms, heavy pressure, heavily – shaded style of writing, lance like t-crossings and your ending strokes carried almost straight down instead of finishing straight out or curled upward.

Forward Slant

 

Heavy Pressured Hand


(2) Frustrated personality: –

These people due to barriers in their mind have cramped, small writing. The alphabets are written putting in a lot of pressure. Eg: – Capital i is written with a single stroke and heavy pressured hand.

Small letters like a’s and o’s are tied with tight knots and tightly closed.

Knotted a’s and o’s


The signature has a unique feature of being encircled with a large loop.

Signature

The t-bars are short, even-pressured and crossed low on the stem.

Low t-bars

There are lots of hooks, catches and backward movements in writing.

Backward Hand

(3) Fearful person: –Fears are normally without any foundation and are baseless. One of the signs distinctly shown is poor rhythm in writing — suggesting lack of muscular coordination, this is due to uncontrolled variation in pen pressure and extreme variation in size of small letters. The sentences may also be left incomplete due to inability to hold a pen steadily.

Mind showing Fear

Child showing Fearful Mind

(4) Emotionally Imbalanced: –

You can use your handwriting as your own personal measuring scale for emotional storming. The pressure with which a person writes changes according to rise or fall of his feelings.

Emotion Matcher

It also shows a sign of danger if it is consistently getting heavier indicating an emotional influence on daily activities. This may result in stress and strain leading to mental or physical illness.

Emotions out of control

This can also be used as a way to check out the stress level at the time of examination. The lighter your pen pressure the healthier you are liable to be. If you observe two many fluctuation in your daily work, you need to seek someone’s help who can get you back on an even heel.


So, the next time when you write words on the paper try to look out for the signs that are getting revealed. Once you have figured them out, it will help you to improve and result in better state of mind, which can work much more efficiently.

Learning to learn effectively

Improving your memory

Memory is not merely a tool for efficient study. It is an essential part of our life and progress. Without a memory, we would be totally helpless!

  • Some facts about memory

We do not have a single, general memory, but a group of specialized memories e.g. a memory for figures, faces, numbers … through an endless list.

The senses – slight, hearing, touch … play an important part in the memory process. Scotland Yard inspectors train to use their eyes, and never pass a face without noting some outstanding feature.

Memory is like a filing cabinet – information is stored under categories.

It is like a storehouse – where experiences are recorded in the brain as memory ‘traces’. If you think of the same thing repeatedly, the traces grow deeper and become more permanent.

Memory operates like a “neural habit”. Things seen and heard together cohere together and are remembered in this way. This is called association.

  • Why we forget

We easily forget whatever we feel is unimportant, uninteresting and dull. Research has also shown that there is a time frame within which we forget e.g.

Half is forgotten in the first one hour

Two-third in 9 hours

64% after 24 hours

74% after 6 days

78% after 1 month

  • Practical implications

First of all, KNOW your strengths. What and how do you ‘naturally’ remember best?

Some remember best by seeing. They see it in their mind’s eye, and are confident that they are correct.

Others have a good auditory memory. It helps them to read aloud, to listen, use tapes, teach, and talk – even to their dog!

Most people use a combination of senses, though they recognize their special strengths.

Pay attention and be interested – very interested. Many great men did not have particularly good memories, but displayed superior capacity in the area of their interest. Churchill displayed genius in areas of interest — but he could never remember where he placed his glasses or his false teeth!

Use association – the more other facts a fact is associated with, the better. Association involves:

– Similarity (cigarettes – cigars)

– Opposites (good – bad)

– Togetherness (Romeo – Juliet)

Use repetition. Repeat before you forget. When you wish to remember what is important, or what needs to be learnt in detail e.g. formulae, try this time scale:

  • Repeat a) Almost immediately after it is presented;

b) After 1 hour;

c) After 24 hours; thereafter

d) After 2 days – 6 days – 1 month

  • Difficulties and how to cope with some of them
  • Concentration – depends on the balance of interests at the moment. Give more weight and importance to your studies and balance them against another interest. Motives help in this.
  • Tiredness / ‘Fed-upness’ – The trick is not to give up, to persist despite your feelings. After you persist for sometime, a strange thing happens: the tiredness lifts – and you are underway:
  • Procrastination, postponing – DIVE into your work – RUSH in, start at once. Don’t give yourself time to utter the word “later on”. Persist for a while, and the same phenomenon as above will occur.
  • Lack of progress, despite efforts – Go for help to a teacher, your parents, a counselor. There may be a temporary block or obstacle where you need support; more easy to correct if you go early.
  • Mnemonic devices (from the Greek goddess of memory) used to remember isolated facts through the use of ‘catch words’, acronyms, etc. E.g. telephone No. 2843: too – late – for – tea.

Acronyms – from the first letter of every word e.g. UNICEF, UNO etc

Try not to use devices in your serious study if you can do without them. Interesting generally and fun – but can create painful dependency in some.

Sarita Houston

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HOW EMOTIONAL ARE YOU?

 

 

ARE YOU

 

Most of the time .
Find out

There is no right or wrong answer.Tick the answer that is applicable to you.

1. I speak with gestures most of the time.
Yes / No.

2. My feelings are easily hurt.
Yes / No.

3. I fell upset when not appreciated for a good piece of work.
Yes / No.

4. I care about peoples opinions
Yes / No.

5. I have difficulty in starting / holding a conversation
Yes / No.

6. I’d rather be alone than in a social gathering
Yes / No.

7. I think I would like the kind of work a librarian does
Yes / No.

8. I take it seriously when people make fun of me.
Yes / No.

9. My hardest battles are with myself
Yes / No.

10. I always seen to care what others think of me
Yes / No.

11. I like to play indoor games to outdoor games
Yes / No.

12. I am liked by most people who know me
Yes / No.

13. I cry more than three a week
Yes / No.

14. My face makes my feelings very evident
Yes / No.

15. I believe in life hereafter
Yes / No.

16. I like collecting flowers / growing plants
Yes / No.

17. Criticism / Scolding hurts me terribly even if it is for my good
Yes / No.

18. My conducted is largely controlled by those around me
Yes / No.

19. I frequently find myself worrying about something
Yes / No.

20. I cry easily seeing emotional movies
Yes / No.


SCORING

Total all the Yes’ answers

Score

15 – 20 – High

9 –14 – Average

1 – 9 – Low

Description: –

A person scoring high on the questionnaire is generally an introvert. He / She tends to draw away from social groups and they exhibit general shyness. He / She may brood over petty matters and are most of the time day dreaming. He / She may have difficulty making decisions and when making one, would cater to social worms. They give up on many important things in life and therefore may feel depressed. Emotional people have a toll on their health too. They generally suffer from acidity, ulcers, constipation insomnia and such.

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EXAMINATION FEVER – HOW TO COME OUT A WINNER

A systematic, methodical, rational, graded approach to the finals of any semester takes the terror out of the event. And oh! The blessedness of facing your question paper without a pounding heart, hammering pulse and a dry mouth!

Dr. ELAINE ANN CHARLES

Dr (Mrs.) Elaine Ann Charles M.A. M.Ed., Ph.D. is Principal of St. Xavier’s Institute of Education and Examiner at the B.A., B.Ed. and M.Ed. University Examinations.

We are living today in a world of numbers. Each year around twelve lakh students appear for the S.S.C. Examination in Maharashtra State alone. Approximately 50% of these students apply for admission to college and this number is rapidly increasing. While the demand for admission into colleges is on the increase, the number of colleges in existence continues to remain almost the same. Hence, in economic terms, the demand is greater than the supply.

Further, in the absence of a sound and suitable administrative procedure for admissions, colleges are compelled to resort to percentages obtained at Board Exams, to determine entry into a stream, a course or a professional degree. This in turn gives rise to fierce competition and in the final analysis we find ourselves engulfed in a world of numbers, where fierce competition exists and in a marks-oriented society, where every mark counts and where a single mark can often make the difference between entry or refusal into a course, a college or a career.

This being the situation, determining examinations like the SSC and HSC play a major role in the lives of students today. Unfortunately, however, these examinations focus on rote memorisation of content matter, the ability to learn by heart and reproduce answers, speed in writing and neatness in presentation and hence they fail to differentiate between the average and the truly talented students.

Bogged down by such an examination system, pressured by their own desire to excel and prove themselves, anxious to meet parental and societal expectations of them and strangled by cut-throat competition and the uncertainty of the future, our students today are under severe stress and strain. In the absence of a strong, emotional support system, which only the immediate family can offer, they tend to break down. Such students find escape in drugs and hence we can see an increase in the number of suicide or mental depression cases.

However, in the ultimate analysis, it is very evident that the Examination system from which there is no escape continues to play a vital role in the student life. Hence, being aware of the techniques and skills that make for effective and meaningful study and consequent success in these examinations is very essential. This article attempts to present these skills and techniques, briefly and concisely.

The essentials worth knowing are the five Golden Rules to success:

1. REGULAR AND CONSISTENT STUDY: There is no substitute for hard work.

Success is 90% perspiration and 1% inspiration. The motivation must come from

within: I can, I will, I must. Set aside regular hours for going over what was taught to

you that day. Cash in on weekends, public holidays and vacation time for revision.

2. CONTENT MASTERY IS A MUST: Master the core concepts in each content-based

subject. Master the fundamental operations in subjects like Maths and aim at

understanding the topic and not just learning it by heart.

3. TIME & TASK MANAGEMENT ARE ESSENTIAL: Have all your notes and study

material in order. Plan how you will spend your time and frame a timetable for each

day. Also concentrate on the subjects you are weak in or dislike and not just on

certain favourite subjects, at the expense of other equally important ones.

4. SOLVE PREVIOUS YEARS BOARD PAPERS IN WRITING: This helps to develop

writing skills like speed, good hand-writing, spelling, grammar and punctuation. It also

helps to make you aware of the kind of questions to expect.

5. SELECTIVE STUDY IS NOT FOR THOSE WHO WISH TO DO REALLY WELL!!:

A student who does chance or selective study enters the examination hall under great stress. This has psychological consequences, which affect speed, expression and clarity of thought, and results in errors in spelling, grammar and punctuation.

Where to Study?

Choose a place where there is reasonable quiet i.e. minimum disturbances, both inside and outside your home; adequate light (tube light gives the best light for studying) and a continuous supply of fresh, oxygenated air which helps the brain to concentrate and remember.

What do you need to Study?

You basically need a suitable worktable or desk and a comfortable chair, which gives support to your shoulders and back. Remember to occupy a comfortable posture, but avoid too comfortable a posture. Lying down while studying is not conducive to effective study. Also avoid piling all your books on your desk or table, it can be distracting. Keep just the necessary books around you.

Diet and Dress also Affect Studying:

Avoid a heavy lunch if you wish to study in the afternoon and a heavy dinner if you wish to study at night, instead eat light, nutritious foods like sandwiches, fruits or fruit juices, green salads and vegetables or curds and dals. Drink plenty of water while studying. Avoid tight, ill-fitting clothing and use light, loose, comfortable clothes instead.

Adequate Sleep and Rest:

Sleep for 6-7 hours at night. You need to have a good night’s sleep before papers that involve reasoning, thinking and the application of knowledge like Maths and Science. Sleep late on days when you do not have any exam.

When to Study:

All students fall into one of the following two categories:

They are either early morning students or late night students. Whatever your preference, the mind requires a time when there is minimum disturbance and maximum quiet. The rule is: If you wake up early, you need to go to bed early. If you keep up late, you need to wake up late. But you cannot burn the candle at both ends. This can have serious consequences.

When you cannot concentrate or feel lethargic, then remember movement and oral work are the best antidotes. Get up, walk up and down and read or study aloud. Change the place of your studying, splash cold water on your eyes or better still have a quick shower and change into fresh clothes. Do something manual for a change. Above all you must take breaks between your studying. Use this time to have a quick snack or a cool drink, to watch some TV, browse through a magazine or just relax, but not for too long. The rule is to come back to your books as quickly as possible.

Time-wasters to be avoided are long telephone calls, TV watching, loitering around after school, college or tuition classes or attending parties, weddings and social functions.

Time Savers: Frame a written timetable for each day of study. Plan it the night before and review it at the end of each day. Vary the memory and skill subjects. Take memory subjects when you are fresh and skill subjects when you are tired. Fit in time for meals, rest, tuitions etc.

How to Study Effectively: Learning takes place through a cycle of learning, revising, repeating. Follow the SQ3R Method:

S – Survey the topic or chapter. Go through the text or your notes and be aware of the main points it covers.

Q – Go through the questions and ask yourself questions on the topic.

R – Read and understand the text and learn the matter

R – Revise what you have learnt within 1 to 2 hours of learning it for the first time (immediate recall)

R- Review or repeat the matter at increasing intervals (frequent recall).

Aids to Remembering: Writing is nine-tenths remembering. Study something especially difficult, just before you go to bed at night and revise it immediately after you wake up. Make a list of definitions, formulae, abbreviations etc. and give them up daily to someone as you do your tables. Use code words and mnemonics, they help you to remember facts and to revise them quickly, just before your exams.

Here are a few examples of code words: Most students find it very difficult to remember the names of the Axis and Allied Powers who fought in World War I. Yet, two simple words like TAG (Turkey, Austria & Germany) and FER (France, England & Russia) make this very easy.

To remember the functions of the President of India, just remember the code word LEAF and then picture the President wearing a big, green leaf in his pocket, for his main functions are four – L – Legislative, E – Executive, A – Administrative and F – Financial. To remember his Financial Functions just remember BMC (Bombay Municipal Corporation) B – He finalizes the Budget, M – He decides if a Bill is a Money Bill and C – He determines Contingency Expenditure.

To recall the States where jute is obtained, remember the code word BOAT and picture a boat loaded with jute bags. Because jute is found in B – Bangladesh, O – Orissa, A – Assam and T – Tamilnadu.

The technique of forming code words involves underlying the key words, then taking the first letter of each keyword and putting all the letters together to form one word or grouping letters to make two or more words. Try to associate the code word with a mental picture. Remember, the funnier the picture the easier it is to remember.

If you find you cannot form a sensible code word with the letters, perhaps because of the absence of vowels, try the Sentence Framing Technique. Frame a sentence with words beginning with each of these letters e.g. it is very easy to remember the names of the planets, in terms of their distance from the sun, by the sentence “My (Mercury) very (Venus) elegant (Earth) Mother (Mars) just (Jupiter) served (Saturn) us (Uranus) nine (Neptune) pies (Pluto)”.

Try associating the sentence with a picture too – it helps.

Two people need to be kept at ease and happy in any examination – The Examiner and the Examinee. Untidy papers, bad handwriting, illegible writing due to faint ink, no paragraphing, supplements not tied in order, answers to a single question split up or irrelevant answers, all these upset Examiners. Neatness and order in your presentation earns you the Examiner’s goodwill and also better marks.

Examinees to keep calm and Cool: Keep all your examination material ready the night before. Copy the timetable carefully. Carry your hall ticket daily for Board and University Exams. Leave home well in advance on Exam days. Visit your Centre a day before the exams commence so you are well acquainted with the location of the hall and your room. Stop studying once you leave home.

Just before the paper begins – Relax. Even if you feel you have forgotten everything do not try to check out on your memory by trying to recall some formula, date or fact. You may not remember and this can destroy your self-confidence. Above all make God a partner in your exams. Pray as though everything depended on God and work as if everything depended on you. Remember, together you make an unbeatable pair … a sure winning combination.

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Where there is a problem there is a solution

There may be some people who may not agree with this heading so we can make a concession, ‘ where there is a problem there is a solution, although the solution maybe difficult to find’, but if you try hard enough you will find a solution because—“where there is a problem there is a solution”.This is not just a piece of boring advice for the young readers but an actual truth of life, which I would like to share.
Many a times we have problems which we don’t share with others thinking they will pass or get solved .At that time, we may not want to admit our faults and shortcomings, hence we keep things to ourselves but most often than not problems don’t get solved by themselves, they only get complicated and do come out in the open assuming bigger dimensions.

Let’s take a concrete example, you are not able to understand a problem/sum in class and you don’t tell the teacher. You don’t ask because you are shy or you don’t want others to know but in the process you are aggravating the problem, because during the exam if you are not able to solve it you are the sufferer and nobody else.

So why should you be your own enemy? Whenever you have problems ask your parents or teachers, they will be more than happy to help you. Now zeelearn.com brings you some fantastic news. You can write in your problems and our experts will help you in solving them. Childhood and adolescence is the worry- free period of life —-keep it that way!

Shuchi Mathur

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Ego Syndrome

Ego forms an important personality trait in all of us. It is good to an extent, but too much of an ego is disastrous. There are instances worldwide where famous personalities have perished because their ego spoke more than their personality.
One develops ego in many ways. First and foremost is when one achieves overnight success. It makes one feel elated and makes one think that one has achieved the ultimate in life. One, then, shows off one’s newfound wealth. That is where the downfall begins.
Another reasons for an inflated ego is when one inherits immense wealth. This one flaunts at every available occasion. Since the person concerned has not earned this wealth through hard-work, his concerns revolve round wealth alone and how it could be used to impress people.
Such blatant exhibitionism does not take a person anywhere. It spells doom. Remember, if you develop an ego without achieving something on your own, it is shallow. Try to develop a long-lasting personality trait. Initially, you may have to strive and struggle but, in the long run, you will be admired and respected for your achievements. False ego is also around you. Cultivate true friends who praise you for what you do, but are equally candid in their criticism if you falter and fumble in your efforts.
Egotism is constant, excessive reference to oneself, in writing or speaking. The egotist is supreme in the self-created world of his own. He acts as if he the whole universe revolves around him and he gives the impression that if he dies, the world would come to a halt. Far from being unsure, he is bursting with self-importance. He is “in love with himself”.
In speech, he constantly refers to “I”, “me”, “mine”. Nothing else seems to matter to him except what he does, what he says, what he thinks, what he owns. He believes (strongly) that other people should be as interested in his affairs as he is himself. If they do not, he concludes that they lack the intelligence to appreciate him. Or, he feels hurt or insulted. The latter occurs more often. He tries to manage everything himself, telling everybody else what to do and how to do it; forcing his opinions, beliefs and prejudices upon others. Thus, he has few friends, for those who would have been, quickly tire of his personality and influence. They retire from his presence, either gracefully or with disgust, depending upon their own temperament.
Even this, however, is not likely to upset an egocentric for long. His ego will receive a shock, but he does not worry. He is “self-sufficient” and can get along well enough without those who reject him.

Ego and PrideYou must be able to distinguish between ego and pride. An egoist lives in a world of make-believes and illusions while a person proud of his achievements knows that he has achieved success solely through his own efforts. He is aware of his own efforts. He is aware of his own capabilities, strengths and weaknesses. This pride is genuinely reflected in his demeanour and carriage. He beams self-confidence and inspires those who come into contact with him. He carries a certain aura around him and part of the self-confidence he exudes is reflected in others.
To exude such an aura and self-confidence and spread healthy vibes around, you must not fall into the trap of egoism. Imbibe the following traits in your personality:
i) Never ever consider yourself superior to others.
ii) Never under-estimate other’s capabilities.
iii)Never humiliate others through harsh words.
iv) Never look down upon others.
v) Never fall a victim to ego. Do not assume credit for success, achievements and legacies for which you are not directly and legitimately responsible.
vi) Never be self-centred in matters of friendship. Never attribute motives to friendship or have motives of your own in befriending others.
vii) Be sincere, hardworking and genuine. Let the world know these qualities in your personality and character.
viii) Look and work for long-term goals.

If you follow these traits, you will certainly make a mark on your own. People will emulate your example, follow you and keep a track of your activities.
“Some are born great, some achieve greatness and some have greatness thrust on them,” said the Bard long, long ago. If you are born great or greatness is thrust on you, do not let it go to your head. Maintain your dignity and poise. Try and emulate some of the positive personality traits of great men. Follow them. This will make you humble and modest – a radically different person from what you might have been if you had let such greatness go to your head. This will also prevent you from flaunting a false ego and showing off.
If you achieve success and greatness on your own, do not forget your past. Remember your roots and the hurdles you have crossed in order to achieve your present status. But, at the same time, be confident to take on new challenges. Try to retain your present success while striving for greater heights. Such achievers are widely respected and held in high esteem. Such success will taste all the sweeter because you have achieved it on your own.
Jyothi S

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General Tips To Succeed In The Examinations

One of the most annoying things about examinations is that you have to take one often. Another, fact is that they refuse to go away. They linger in the form of exercises, tests, assignments and assessments (some English teacher must have looked up all the synonyms she should find) and you never seem to get rid of them. Rather like a bad cold. Common, too.
Studying is a full time job. It is important to keep up with the material throughout the year so that when the final approaches, it will be more like a comprehensive review than a monster memorizing session. Here are some tips to get you through:
When the exam is announced, you have some questions to get cleared first:
1. What is the syllabus or scope of the examination?
2. What kind of examination will it be: objective, short answers, essay type or a combination of all three?
There are several kinds of examinations and your teacher will know well ahead of time what types of questions will be asked.
Choose a method of preparation, which suits the type of examination you will be writing.

For problem solving
· Go through past homework assignments, lecture notes and your textbook. Then, Copy out problems.
· Mix them up.
· Solve as many problems as you can.
· Check your answers.
· For any you do not answer correctly, try to find similar problems and keep working on them.

For short answers
· Make a list of important terms.
· Write down the definition of each term as it was used in the course.
· Think of examples or illustrations of each term.
· Figure out the term or the concept’s relevance to the course.
· Be sure to write enough (questions are usually 4 -5 marks; figure on getting 1 or 2 marks for each significant point you make)
· Think MACRO – relate the terms to the general ideas presented in the course.
· Think MICRO – support your answer with examples.

For essay questions
· Review old essay type answers and assignments. Then select a number of topics that are central to the course, then,
· Write essay answers containing to the subject and main points.
· Write as many essay for each of these, giving yourself only as much time for each as you will have on the exam itself.
· Look over your trial essays, paying attention to areas that could be improved.
· Most essays are graded on information, organization and style.
· Once you have decided on one question, don’t change your mind.
· Write a strong introductory paragraph, which contains your subject, and 3 or 4 main points listed in the order in which you are going to write them.
· Start writing, the more you write the better; include as many references (names, dated, direct quotations) as possible.
· If there are more than one essay type question on the exam, leave a couple of pages after each so that you can add more if you have time.

For objective tests
· Study concepts and examples, as well as facts.
· Study your texts and notes by actively looking for the kind of material that can be answered objectively ( dates, names, precise details)
· Get old copies of multiple choice, exams. Look for patterns in questions and answers throughout certain disciplines.
· Always choose the “best” answer, this is often the answer that uses a word or phrase specific to the course or discipline.
· When in doubt, guess (unless there is a penalty for the wrong answer).

Exam study
· Prepare summary sheets for large amounts of lecture and textbook notes.
· Make review of final notes.
· Stress the following areas in your review : Points emphasized in class or in text
· Look at areas the professor has advised for study.
· Look at questions in study guide, past quizzes, and reviews at the end of textbook.
· Finally the anti-stress formula which is the most important if you want to crack the exam without any anxiety attacks…


THE ANTI- STRESS FORMULA: SQ4R

S = Survey the text to be covered on the exam, paying attention to the graphs, captions, and other visuals.
Q = Form questions of the material as you read each paragraph
R = Read the material thoroughly and try to answer the questions formed above.
R =Recite the main points of each section.
R = Reflect – think in new ways about the material read and relate this to the existing information.
R = Review the entire chapter.

What after Class 10

Take a look at your school life so far. Each year has been different. In the last two years, things have been getting more serious. Class 9 had its own responsibilities to ensure that you did make it to the penultimate year of school. That is, where you are in the new session, brand new class 10 and the final year of secondary school. You know that when you leave school next year, life could look quite different. There would be a lot more freedom, choice, independence; end of homework (maybe!), no one on your back… the scene could be quite different.

But at this point of time, wonder years of college are merely beckoning. To get there, you have to make the best of the few months that remain till your SSC/ICSE/CBSE/ Class X Board examination. Right now, life probably looks like it consists only of studies, projects, assignments, tests, revisions, the final Board examination and then career decisions. Before you know it, all this will be behind you. So, let us plan so that class 10 passes off productively and you have all the cards in your hand. Choices can then be made on your own terms.

KEEP GOING AHEAD

While the school and your teachers are responsible for completing the curriculum, you must also take initiative. Plan to read through your English and other language text books, go over the grammar exercises, read your history lessons (like a story), travel through geography, understand the economics and consider how much of it you can understand yourself. Don’t avoid Maths because certain aspects are extensions or applications of what you have already learnt in earlier classes. I am not saying that you finish the syllabus on your own but to the extent that is possible, you can work ahead. This will give you ample time to understand what lies ahead and what are the stumbling blocks.

You have textbooks, refreshers, guide-books, sample questions, previous years’ questions, tuitions, test packets. ……I possibly missed a few other aids that lurk there to entice you. The problem is not in buying them or in signing up for classes, but that all of that has to be absorbed, analyzed and put to the best use by you. It is better to read one good book ten times than ten mediocre books once.

BITE SIZED PIECES

Take the syllabus; break it up into digestible modules, so that you can complete one revision by Diwali at least. If you are already attending some classes, they may also be working like this. But please remember that attending school, and then tuitions, is not your study time. Your own study time is a personal commitment for which you have to set aside time everyday. Each day as it passes is history, so do not expect to waste time and still be cool for the examination. Work regularly and sincerely, summarize and abbreviate (maybe in the form of important points) your material, and you will find that it lodges more firmly in your mind. Subjects like the sciences, geography, economics and geometry can be remembered through diagrammatic and visual references.

PRE-BOARDS

The selection test, the preparation/ Pre-Board / Mock finals, are to be taken seriously. Research and review of previous years’ records reveal that there is very little deviation between your Pre-Boards and Boards. At this stage, when you spot any weak areas, work harder on them.

After this stage, the best approach is not to try and cram new things. Don’t push yourself to learn all those things you had ignored so far. In doing so, you will not only continue to be weak in those areas, you would also have lost precious time that could have been utilized in strengthening yourself in the topics and chapters that you are confident about. Remember to allocate importance to chapters/ topics, as per the weightage/ marks they attract in the Board exams.

Variety is the spice of life. Break up your study periods between subjects, to have a variety and avoid monotony. Do your revisions at recurring intervals rather than plan to read up an entire book before revising. Move ahead a few steps, then step back and review if what you learnt that last week still remains in your memory.

SKILL BUILDING

While you are commuting between school/ tuitions and home, get into the habit of revising formulae, definitions, practicing your multiplication tables, revising synonyms, antonyms, etc… once you get into the groove, you will find endless possibilities.

Practice writing answers; work out sample papers (yes, even when the syllabus is not over, work on the questions from chapters that are over). After a test, if you are disappointed with your performance, objectively assess where you went wrong – did you study less, were you not as confident or did you take a wrong approach? Take remedial action immediately. Don’t delude yourself that you can make the problem disappear by ignoring it or laying the blame at another’s door.

BALANCING OUT

Study is high priority but you must also take breaks to relax, exercise, eat, sleep, etc. during some breaks, read to raise your career awareness as you think about college choices. Career descriptions in career books will raise your awareness of your job possibilities.

AFTER IT’S OVER

You will be called upon to decide on whether you want to study science, arts or commerce. All streams are good but you should be clear about your reason for choosing a particular stream and understand if they can lead you to your goals. In formulating your goals you can ask yourself, “What do I like best? Am I strong in science? In maths? In the social sciences? If so, what choices should I make for college?”

The way you perform in classes 9-10 build the foundation on which career options and directions are selected. Performance in subjects of class 10 lead to curriculum choices in classes XI-XII, which add up to college choices and these lead to career possibilities. Keep an open mind about your career choices, and do your best in class 10, so that you can exercise your options.

Career option post SSC.

Congratulations!!! You are one of the 1,56,636 students who passed the SSC this year in Mumbai. Most of you however, may not have secured the percentage you expected and may be rethinking your original plan of action. Should I opt for commerce instead of Science? How good are diploma courses? Are there any new courses that I need to know about? These and many more questions cloud your mind.

Here are some courses you can pursue directly after your SSC.

Automobile Engineering

You will design, develop, manufacture and maintain automobile ranging from tractors and two wheelers to jeeps, trucks and even sports cars. The entry of new companies in the car industry as a result of liberalisation, had led to a very favourable situation. Jobs lie with automobile manufacturing companies, automobile component manufacturing companies, and automobile distributors.

Course: Diploma in Automobile Engineering

Institutes:

Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel Polytechnic

IC Colony, Link Road, Borivali (W),
Mumbai – 400 103.
Tel.: 891 1473/ 892 5045
E-mail: svppoly@hotmail.com

VJ Technical Institute

HR Mahagani Road,
Matunga, Mumbai.
Tel.: 414 6972/ 414 6973/ 414 6974
E-mail: vjtil@soochak.ncst.ernet.in

Construction Technology

You will specialize in building dams, ports, bridges, fly-overs and any other infrastructure that requires steel and concrete. The infrastructure sector in India will witness a rapid growth over the next few years with a fresh bout of investment both, foreign and domestic. Jobs lie with civil and industrial construction companies like HCC, Petron Engineering, L&T, and others.

Course: Diploma in Construction Technology/ Civil Engineering

Institutes:

Agnel Polytechnic (Fr. Agnel Charities)
Navi Mumbai, Sector-9A, Vashi,
Navi Mumbai – 400 703

Vidya Vardhini’s Bhausaheb Vartak Polytechnic
Thane, Vasai Raod,
Thane, District Thane – 401 202

Computer Engineering

You will design, develop, manufacture, assemble, and test computer or compute related equipment for domestic, commercial, industrial, military, or scientific use. Your job will also involve manufacturing, installing, and servicing of computer or computer-related equipment and components.

Opportunities lie in various computer hardware manufacturing companies, computer hardware distributors, resellers, maintenance companies, software marketing and maintenance companies, and other related companies.

Course: Diploma in Computer Engineering

Institutions:

Government Polytechnic
49, Kherwadi,
Ali Yawar Jung Marg,
Mumbai – 400 051
Tel.: 642 6587/ 651 4932/ 645 4057

Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel Polytechnic
IC Colony, Link Road,
Borivali (W), Mumbai – 400 103.
Tel.: 891 1473/ 892 5045

Digital Electronics

We are living in a digital era and you will drive it forward. You will design, develop, manufacture and service digital equipment – everything from pocket calculators to palmtop computers. Job opportunities exist in electronics companies and servicing centres.

Course: Diploma in Digital Electronics/ Electronics Engineering

Institutes:

Hyderabad (Sindh) National Collegiate Board,
Opp. Railway Station,
Ulhasnagar,

District Samaj’s Shri SS Jondhale Polytechnic
Shastri Nagar,
Dombivali,
District Thane – 421 202

Telecommunication Engineering

You will wire the unwired world and make the unwired world wireless. Telecommunication Technology is the backbone that drives the networked world. You will ensure that services like telephone, mobile telephony, satellite communication, radio, radar, television, broadcasting, internet, fax, etc., are up and running smoothly. Your work will also include research and development of advanced technologies, both hardware and software. Your skills will be sought after by telecommunication companies as well as companies in the field of information technology.

Course: Diploma in Telecommunication Engineering/ Electronics and Telecommunication Engineering.

Institutes:

Bharati Vidyapeeth’s Institute of Technology
CBD Sector – 7, Belapur,
District Thane,
New Bombay – 400 615.

Smarth Samaj’s Shri SS Jondhale Polytechnic

Shastri Nagar, Dombivali,
District Thane – 421 202

Interior Decoration

You will plan, design, and finish Interiors of residential and commercial premises. You will not only look after the aesthetic aspect of your design but also make it practical and cost effective. Jobs exist with Interior designer firms, furniture manufacturing firms, large furniture stores, large furnishing material stores, paint companies, etc.

Course: Diploma in Interior Decoration

Institute:

Bharati Vidyapeeth School of Interior & Decoration
New Bombay.
Tel.: 757 1505/ 1182

Textile Designing

Textile Designers design colours, paterns, hues, and texture of fabric or cloth. This field is related to the garment industry as a whole and is one of the largest in the world. You could work with textile design consultants, fabric manufacturing and export companies, garment-manufacturing companies, and other related companies.

Course: Diploma in Textile Designing

Institute:

CD Dalal Junior Institute of Home Science
Dept. of Continuing Adult Education & Extension Work
SNDT, 1, Nathibai Thackersey Road,
Mumbai – 400 020
Tel.: 203 1879

Commercial Art

This includes specializations like Animation Design, Interior Design; Ceramic Design etc. professional can work with advertising agencies, design consultants, outdoor advertising agencies and other related organizations.

Course: Diploma in Commercial Art

Institute:

Sophia Polytechnic
Mumbai
Tel.: 363 3304/ 1642

Medical Laboratory Technology

The job involves performing medical tests such as blood tests, urine tests, etc., and radiological methods like X-ray and Ultrasonography. Employment opportunities in diagnostic centres, hospitals, healthcare centres, polytechnics etc., are all set to grow on a mammoth scale within the next five years.

Alternatively, you can pursue Opthalmic Technology. You will diagnose disorders of the visual system and prescribe spectacles, contact lenses, etc., this too offers numerous job opportunities in multi-specialty hospitals eye hospitals eye care centres, eye clinics, and opticlans.

Course: Diploma in Medical Laboratory Technology/ Opthalmic Technology

Institute:

Premila Vithaldas Polytechnic, Mumbai

Address: SNDT Women’s University
Juhu Road, Santacruz (West),
Mumbai – 400 049.
Tel.: 262 2354

Leather and Footwear Technology

As a leather and footwear technologist, you will process different kinds of leather, customized to the specification of a particular product. Jobs are mainly with footwear manufacturing companies and leather accessories manufacturing companies. Leather is more of an export industry and you can do well with your own start up too.

Course: Diploma in leather and footwear Technology

Institute:

Government institute of Leather Technology

GILT, 49, Kherwadi,
Ali Yawar Jung Marg,
Bandra (East),
Mumbai – 400 051
Tel.: 640 1780

Precautions while lighting Firecrackers.

  1. Always-light firecrackers in an open ground.
  2. You must keep a safe distance while lighting firecrackers. Do not bend over the firecrackers while lighting them.
  3. Always ensure the presence of elders while lighting crackers.
  4. Never wear loose or synthetic clothes while lighting firecrackers.
  5. While lighting crackers ensure that you wear proper foot wear.
  6. Make sure you buy firecrackers from Government approved shops only.
  7. Bursting of firecrackers cause heavy noise and air pollution. So please make sure you do not light crackers that may cause trouble to old people.
  8. In case of burns, pour cold water over the injury before consulting your doctor.
  9. In case of electrical short circuits due to crackers, do not pour water but use mud or sand instead.
  10. As far as possible avoid bursting crackers which cause a lot of noise and environmental pollution.

SHAKESPEREAN TIPS

Shakespeare the name invokes awe and admiration and yes apprehension and fear too in 15 year olds who have to study a Shakespeare test. Then the oft repeated question ‘Why are we tortured thus? Here is a reassurance from a lover of Shakespeare who is also a teacher of Shakespeare. Overcome that mental block and you will realize that the Bard can be enjoyed – he offers that blend of humour, love and plot that never fails to appeal – but all expressed in that majestic language that never fails to thrill. His knowledge of human psychology is as relevant today and many of us can see shades of ourselves in his characters.

You can enjoy Shakespeare and what’s more important score in Shakespeare too. Here goes – First read a simplified version of the story. Then Read a speech and translate it sentence by sentence into simple English yourself.
Then take the speech as a whole a second time and by the third reading you will understand it clearly and be able to answer any question on it. Remember that at the Std. X level you are mainly asked textual information and not much characterisation. Be thorough with the names of characters and be able to identify their speeches as also the specific location of each scene.

At the ICSE level you are given annotations, which consist of a few lines – take time to understand the annotation. Be clear who is speaking and who is being addressed. Locate where exactly in the play the lines appear and then go on to answer the questions – be specific giving textual information to substantiate your answers. If your view or opinion is requested give your individual opinion as long as it is relevant and can be substantiated with textual matter. Don’t be scared to give your unabashed opinion. Different people can read different meanings into the same lines and your understanding and interpretation may be more profound.

Keep reading your text regularly. Memorize important speeches and say them out aloud and with feeling – this will help to increase your understanding and your enjoyment of the play. They will also provide you with pithy sayings for numerous occasions in the future. The Bard has something apt to say for every occasion or event be it yesterday, today or tomorrow as he is not for an age but for all time’. Once you enjoy one play you will be hungry to sample more. I am speaking from experience; I have had students who started by calling him ‘Boringsphere’ but ending up as much Shakespeare addicts as yours truly.

Enjoy yourself as you learn.

Doris Saldhana

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TIPS ON TAKING DOWN NOTES

If you carefully note down what the teacher says you’ll be ready when test time comes around, right? But that’s not always the case. Effective note taking follows a two-phase strategy. Follow the outline below and you’ll find that you retain more information, actually learning what’s being covered in lectures. Plus, you’ll be better prepared for that lurking pop quiz. Bonus!

Phase I—In Class

Make preparations:

  • Get to class early, grab a good seat, and look over the notes from the previous class.
  • Start each class with a new sheet of paper, always writing the date and subject on top.
  • Try to leave an extra wide margin by drawing a line parallel to the original margin (you’ll need this space in phase II).

Write down key terms:

  • You can’t possibly write down everything a teacher says without missing key points.
  • Write down new and unfamiliar terms.
  • Always note everything a teacher writes on the board.
  • If you only write down key points, you’ll still have a pretty good overview.
  • Key points act as memory triggers.

Include definitions and explanations of key terms wherever possible:

  • Scratch down anything which will help you remember the key terms.
  • Develop shorthand / avoid complete sentences—just grab the vital information.
  • Don’t worry about spelling and punctuation.
  • Use abbreviations only after you are familiar enough with the terms they stand for.
  • Use signs, symbols, charts, and diagrams.

Construct a rough outline:

  • Don’t worry about creating a “standard” outline.
  • Aim for creating structured notes that make sense to you.

Note general themes of the lecture:

  • At the end of each lecture, take a few minutes to jot down the major themes.
  • Definitely note what has been repeated.
  • Focus on the beginning and end of the lectures; usually this info will encapsulate the major themes and topics of the day.

Phase II—Note-Taking Out of Class

Read over you notes:

  • You don’t have to spend a lot of time doing this, maybe one or two hours a week.
  • It’s a good idea to do it on a Friday or over the weekend–waiting will help you to see the topic with fresh eyes.

Ask yourself questions:

  • “What does this mean?”
  • “Does it make sense?”
  • “How are these terms and topics related?”
  • “How do they fit into the big picture?”

Make notes on your notes:

  • Remember the fat margins? Here’s where they come in.
  • As you ask questions of yourself, write down answers and confusions here.
  • Make connections, you should now have a better sense of the important info and be able to see an overview.
  • Jot down thoughts, and use the back of the sheet if necessary.

Go to other sources:

  • Any lingering questions you may have should be addressed.
  • It’s time to take responsibility for your own education – you can’t learn everything from the teacher’s lecture.

Additional sources of info:

  • Borrow a friend’s notes.
  • Check your textbook.
  • Hang out in the library and utilize its vast resources.
  • Talk with your teacher.

Fill in additional info:

  • As you go to these other sources and answer your questions, go back to your notes and fill in the blanks.

Rewrite your notes (optional):

  • After going through this entire process, you may want to rewrite your notes in a way that incorporates your new information and which makes more sense to you.
  • The simple process of rewriting may help you memoriz

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Learning to learn effectively

Improving your memory

Memory is not merely a tool for efficient study. It is an essential part of our life and progress. Without a memory, we would be totally helpless!

  • Some facts about memory

We do not have a single, general memory, but a group of specialized memories e.g. a memory for figures, faces, numbers … through an endless list.

The senses – slight, hearing, touch … play an important part in the memory process. Scotland Yard inspectors train to use their eyes, and never pass a face without noting some outstanding feature.

Memory is like a filing cabinet – information is stored under categories.

It is like a storehouse – where experiences are recorded in the brain as memory ‘traces’. If you think of the same thing repeatedly, the traces grow deeper and become more permanent.

Memory operates like a “neural habit”. Things seen and heard together cohere together and are remembered in this way. This is called association.

  • Why we forget

We easily forget whatever we feel is unimportant, uninteresting and dull. Research has also shown that there is a time frame within which we forget e.g.

Half is forgotten in the first one hour

Two-third in 9 hours

64% after 24 hours

74% after 6 days

78% after 1 month

  • Practical implications

First of all, KNOW your strengths. What and how do you ‘naturally’ remember best?

Some remember best by seeing. They see it in their mind’s eye, and are confident that they are correct.

Others have a good auditory memory. It helps them to read aloud, to listen, use tapes, teach, and talk – even to their dog!

Most people use a combination of senses, though they recognize their special strengths.

Pay attention and be interested – very interested. Many great men did not have particularly good memories, but displayed superior capacity in the area of their interest. Churchill displayed genius in areas of interest — but he could never remember where he placed his glasses or his false teeth!

Use association – the more other facts a fact is associated with, the better. Association involves:

– Similarity (cigarettes – cigars)

– Opposites (good – bad)

– Togetherness (Romeo – Juliet)

Use repetition. Repeat before you forget. When you wish to remember what is important, or what needs to be learnt in detail e.g. formulae, try this time scale:

  • Repeat a) Almost immediately after it is presented;

b) After 1 hour;

c) After 24 hours; thereafter

d) After 2 days – 6 days – 1 month

  • Difficulties and how to cope with some of them
  • Concentration – depends on the balance of interests at the moment. Give more weight and importance to your studies and balance them against another interest. Motives help in this.
  • Tiredness / ‘Fed-upness’ – The trick is not to give up, to persist despite your feelings. After you persist for sometime, a strange thing happens: the tiredness lifts – and you are underway:
  • Procrastination, postponing – DIVE into your work – RUSH in, start at once. Don’t give yourself time to utter the word “later on”. Persist for a while, and the same phenomenon as above will occur.
  • Lack of progress, despite efforts – Go for help to a teacher, your parents, a counselor. There may be a temporary block or obstacle where you need support; more easy to correct if you go early.
  • Mnemonic devices (from the Greek goddess of memory) used to remember isolated facts through the use of ‘catch words’, acronyms, etc. E.g. telephone No. 2843: too – late – for – tea.

Acronyms – from the first letter of every word e.g. UNICEF, UNO etc

Try not to use devices in your serious study if you can do without them. Interesting generally and fun – but can create painful dependency in some.

Sarita Houston

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HOW EMOTIONAL ARE YOU?

 

 

ARE YOU

 

Most of the time .
Find out

There is no right or wrong answer.

Tick the answer that is applicable to you.

1. I speak with gestures most of the time.
Yes / No.

2. My feelings are easily hurt.
Yes / No.

3. I fell upset when not appreciated for a good piece of work.
Yes / No.

4. I care about peoples opinions
Yes / No.

5. I have difficulty in starting / holding a conversation
Yes / No.

6. I’d rather be alone than in a social gathering
Yes / No.

7. I think I would like the kind of work a librarian does
Yes / No.

8. I take it seriously when people make fun of me.
Yes / No.

9. My hardest battles are with myself
Yes / No.

10. I always seen to care what others think of me
Yes / No.

11. I like to play indoor games to outdoor games
Yes / No.

12. I am liked by most people who know me
Yes / No.

13. I cry more than three a week
Yes / No.

14. My face makes my feelings very evident
Yes / No.

15. I believe in life hereafter
Yes / No.

16. I like collecting flowers / growing plants
Yes / No.

17. Criticism / Scolding hurts me terribly even if it is for my good
Yes / No.

18. My conducted is largely controlled by those around me
Yes / No.

19. I frequently find myself worrying about something
Yes / No.

20. I cry easily seeing emotional movies
Yes / No.


SCORING

Total all the Yes’ answers

Score

15 – 20 – High

9 –14 – Average

1 – 9 – Low

Description: –

A person scoring high on the questionnaire is generally an introvert. He / She tends to draw away from social groups and they exhibit general shyness. He / She may brood over petty matters and are most of the time day dreaming. He / She may have difficulty making decisions and when making one, would cater to social worms. They give up on many important things in life and therefore may feel depressed. Emotional people have a toll on their health too. They generally suffer from acidity, ulcers, constipation insomnia and such.

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EXAMINATION FEVER – HOW TO COME OUT A WINNER

A systematic, methodical, rational, graded approach to the finals of any semester takes the terror out of the event. And oh! The blessedness of facing your question paper without a pounding heart, hammering pulse and a dry mouth!

Dr. ELAINE ANN CHARLES

Dr (Mrs.) Elaine Ann Charles M.A. M.Ed., Ph.D. is Principal of St. Xavier’s Institute of Education and Examiner at the B.A., B.Ed. and M.Ed. University Examinations.

We are living today in a world of numbers. Each year around twelve lakh students appear for the S.S.C. Examination in Maharashtra State alone. Approximately 50% of these students apply for admission to college and this number is rapidly increasing. While the demand for admission into colleges is on the increase, the number of colleges in existence continues to remain almost the same. Hence, in economic terms, the demand is greater than the supply.

Further, in the absence of a sound and suitable administrative procedure for admissions, colleges are compelled to resort to percentages obtained at Board Exams, to determine entry into a stream, a course or a professional degree. This in turn gives rise to fierce competition and in the final analysis we find ourselves engulfed in a world of numbers, where fierce competition exists and in a marks-oriented society, where every mark counts and where a single mark can often make the difference between entry or refusal into a course, a college or a career.

This being the situation, determining examinations like the SSC and HSC play a major role in the lives of students today. Unfortunately, however, these examinations focus on rote memorisation of content matter, the ability to learn by heart and reproduce answers, speed in writing and neatness in presentation and hence they fail to differentiate between the average and the truly talented students.

Bogged down by such an examination system, pressured by their own desire to excel and prove themselves, anxious to meet parental and societal expectations of them and strangled by cut-throat competition and the uncertainty of the future, our students today are under severe stress and strain. In the absence of a strong, emotional support system, which only the immediate family can offer, they tend to break down. Such students find escape in drugs and hence we can see an increase in the number of suicide or mental depression cases.

However, in the ultimate analysis, it is very evident that the Examination system from which there is no escape continues to play a vital role in the student life. Hence, being aware of the techniques and skills that make for effective and meaningful study and consequent success in these examinations is very essential. This article attempts to present these skills and techniques, briefly and concisely.

The essentials worth knowing are the five Golden Rules to success:

1. REGULAR AND CONSISTENT STUDY: There is no substitute for hard work.

Success is 90% perspiration and 1% inspiration. The motivation must come from

within: I can, I will, I must. Set aside regular hours for going over what was taught to

you that day. Cash in on weekends, public holidays and vacation time for revision.

2. CONTENT MASTERY IS A MUST: Master the core concepts in each content-based

subject. Master the fundamental operations in subjects like Maths and aim at

understanding the topic and not just learning it by heart.

3. TIME & TASK MANAGEMENT ARE ESSENTIAL: Have all your notes and study

material in order. Plan how you will spend your time and frame a timetable for each

day. Also concentrate on the subjects you are weak in or dislike and not just on

certain favourite subjects, at the expense of other equally important ones.

4. SOLVE PREVIOUS YEARS BOARD PAPERS IN WRITING: This helps to develop

writing skills like speed, good hand-writing, spelling, grammar and punctuation. It also

helps to make you aware of the kind of questions to expect.

5. SELECTIVE STUDY IS NOT FOR THOSE WHO WISH TO DO REALLY WELL!!:

A student who does chance or selective study enters the examination hall under great stress. This has psychological consequences, which affect speed, expression and clarity of thought, and results in errors in spelling, grammar and punctuation.

Where to Study?

Choose a place where there is reasonable quiet i.e. minimum disturbances, both inside and outside your home; adequate light (tube light gives the best light for studying) and a continuous supply of fresh, oxygenated air which helps the brain to concentrate and remember.

What do you need to Study?

You basically need a suitable worktable or desk and a comfortable chair, which gives support to your shoulders and back. Remember to occupy a comfortable posture, but avoid too comfortable a posture. Lying down while studying is not conducive to effective study. Also avoid piling all your books on your desk or table, it can be distracting. Keep just the necessary books around you.

Diet and Dress also Affect Studying:

Avoid a heavy lunch if you wish to study in the afternoon and a heavy dinner if you wish to study at night, instead eat light, nutritious foods like sandwiches, fruits or fruit juices, green salads and vegetables or curds and dals. Drink plenty of water while studying. Avoid tight, ill-fitting clothing and use light, loose, comfortable clothes instead.

Adequate Sleep and Rest:

Sleep for 6-7 hours at night. You need to have a good night’s sleep before papers that involve reasoning, thinking and the application of knowledge like Maths and Science. Sleep late on days when you do not have any exam.

When to Study:

All students fall into one of the following two categories:

They are either early morning students or late night students. Whatever your preference, the mind requires a time when there is minimum disturbance and maximum quiet. The rule is: If you wake up early, you need to go to bed early. If you keep up late, you need to wake up late. But you cannot burn the candle at both ends. This can have serious consequences.

When you cannot concentrate or feel lethargic, then remember movement and oral work are the best antidotes. Get up, walk up and down and read or study aloud. Change the place of your studying, splash cold water on your eyes or better still have a quick shower and change into fresh clothes. Do something manual for a change. Above all you must take breaks between your studying. Use this time to have a quick snack or a cool drink, to watch some TV, browse through a magazine or just relax, but not for too long. The rule is to come back to your books as quickly as possible.

Time-wasters to be avoided are long telephone calls, TV watching, loitering around after school, college or tuition classes or attending parties, weddings and social functions.

Time Savers: Frame a written timetable for each day of study. Plan it the night before and review it at the end of each day. Vary the memory and skill subjects. Take memory subjects when you are fresh and skill subjects when you are tired. Fit in time for meals, rest, tuitions etc.

How to Study Effectively: Learning takes place through a cycle of learning, revising, repeating. Follow the SQ3R Method:

S – Survey the topic or chapter. Go through the text or your notes and be aware of the main points it covers.

Q – Go through the questions and ask yourself questions on the topic.

R – Read and understand the text and learn the matter

R – Revise what you have learnt within 1 to 2 hours of learning it for the first time (immediate recall)

R- Review or repeat the matter at increasing intervals (frequent recall).

Aids to Remembering: Writing is nine-tenths remembering. Study something especially difficult, just before you go to bed at night and revise it immediately after you wake up. Make a list of definitions, formulae, abbreviations etc. and give them up daily to someone as you do your tables. Use code words and mnemonics, they help you to remember facts and to revise them quickly, just before your exams.

Here are a few examples of code words: Most students find it very difficult to remember the names of the Axis and Allied Powers who fought in World War I. Yet, two simple words like TAG (Turkey, Austria & Germany) and FER (France, England & Russia) make this very easy.

To remember the functions of the President of India, just remember the code word LEAF and then picture the President wearing a big, green leaf in his pocket, for his main functions are four – L – Legislative, E – Executive, A – Administrative and F – Financial. To remember his Financial Functions just remember BMC (Bombay Municipal Corporation) B – He finalizes the Budget, M – He decides if a Bill is a Money Bill and C – He determines Contingency Expenditure.

To recall the States where jute is obtained, remember the code word BOAT and picture a boat loaded with jute bags. Because jute is found in B – Bangladesh, O – Orissa, A – Assam and T – Tamilnadu.

The technique of forming code words involves underlying the key words, then taking the first letter of each keyword and putting all the letters together to form one word or grouping letters to make two or more words. Try to associate the code word with a mental picture. Remember, the funnier the picture the easier it is to remember.

If you find you cannot form a sensible code word with the letters, perhaps because of the absence of vowels, try the Sentence Framing Technique. Frame a sentence with words beginning with each of these letters e.g. it is very easy to remember the names of the planets, in terms of their distance from the sun, by the sentence “My (Mercury) very (Venus) elegant (Earth) Mother (Mars) just (Jupiter) served (Saturn) us (Uranus) nine (Neptune) pies (Pluto)”.

Try associating the sentence with a picture too – it helps.

Two people need to be kept at ease and happy in any examination – The Examiner and the Examinee. Untidy papers, bad handwriting, illegible writing due to faint ink, no paragraphing, supplements not tied in order, answers to a single question split up or irrelevant answers, all these upset Examiners. Neatness and order in your presentation earns you the Examiner’s goodwill and also better marks.

Examinees to keep calm and Cool: Keep all your examination material ready the night before. Copy the timetable carefully. Carry your hall ticket daily for Board and University Exams. Leave home well in advance on Exam days. Visit your Centre a day before the exams commence so you are well acquainted with the location of the hall and your room. Stop studying once you leave home.

Just before the paper begins – Relax. Even if you feel you have forgotten everything do not try to check out on your memory by trying to recall some formula, date or fact. You may not remember and this can destroy your self-confidence. Above all make God a partner in your exams. Pray as though everything depended on God and work as if everything depended on you. Remember, together you make an unbeatable pair … a sure winning combination.

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Where there is a problem there is a solution

There may be some people who may not agree with this heading so we can make a concession, ‘ where there is a problem there is a solution, although the solution maybe difficult to find’, but if you try hard enough you will find a solution because—“where there is a problem there is a solution”.

This is not just a piece of boring advice for the young readers but an actual truth of life, which I would like to share.
Many a times we have problems which we don’t share with others thinking they will pass or get solved .At that time, we may not want to admit our faults and shortcomings, hence we keep things to ourselves but most often than not problems don’t get solved by themselves, they only get complicated and do come out in the open assuming bigger dimensions.

Let’s take a concrete example, you are not able to understand a problem/sum in class and you don’t tell the teacher. You don’t ask because you are shy or you don’t want others to know but in the process you are aggravating the problem, because during the exam if you are not able to solve it you are the sufferer and nobody else.

So why should you be your own enemy? Whenever you have problems ask your parents or teachers, they will be more than happy to help you. Now zeelearn.com brings you some fantastic news. You can write in your problems and our experts will help you in solving them. Childhood and adolescence is the worry- free period of life —-keep it that way!

Shuchi Mathur

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Ego Syndrome

Ego forms an important personality trait in all of us. It is good to an extent, but too much of an ego is disastrous. There are instances worldwide where famous personalities have perished because their ego spoke more than their personality.
One develops ego in many ways. First and foremost is when one achieves overnight success. It makes one feel elated and makes one think that one has achieved the ultimate in life. One, then, shows off one’s newfound wealth. That is where the downfall begins.
Another reasons for an inflated ego is when one inherits immense wealth. This one flaunts at every available occasion. Since the person concerned has not earned this wealth through hard-work, his concerns revolve round wealth alone and how it could be used to impress people.
Such blatant exhibitionism does not take a person anywhere. It spells doom. Remember, if you develop an ego without achieving something on your own, it is shallow. Try to develop a long-lasting personality trait. Initially, you may have to strive and struggle but, in the long run, you will be admired and respected for your achievements. False ego is also around you. Cultivate true friends who praise you for what you do, but are equally candid in their criticism if you falter and fumble in your efforts.
Egotism is constant, excessive reference to oneself, in writing or speaking. The egotist is supreme in the self-created world of his own. He acts as if he the whole universe revolves around him and he gives the impression that if he dies, the world would come to a halt. Far from being unsure, he is bursting with self-importance. He is “in love with himself”.
In speech, he constantly refers to “I”, “me”, “mine”. Nothing else seems to matter to him except what he does, what he says, what he thinks, what he owns. He believes (strongly) that other people should be as interested in his affairs as he is himself. If they do not, he concludes that they lack the intelligence to appreciate him. Or, he feels hurt or insulted. The latter occurs more often. He tries to manage everything himself, telling everybody else what to do and how to do it; forcing his opinions, beliefs and prejudices upon others. Thus, he has few friends, for those who would have been, quickly tire of his personality and influence. They retire from his presence, either gracefully or with disgust, depending upon their own temperament.
Even this, however, is not likely to upset an egocentric for long. His ego will receive a shock, but he does not worry. He is “self-sufficient” and can get along well enough without those who reject him.

Ego and Pride

You must be able to distinguish between ego and pride. An egoist lives in a world of make-believes and illusions while a person proud of his achievements knows that he has achieved success solely through his own efforts. He is aware of his own efforts. He is aware of his own capabilities, strengths and weaknesses. This pride is genuinely reflected in his demeanour and carriage. He beams self-confidence and inspires those who come into contact with him. He carries a certain aura around him and part of the self-confidence he exudes is reflected in others.
To exude such an aura and self-confidence and spread healthy vibes around, you must not fall into the trap of egoism. Imbibe the following traits in your personality:
i) Never ever consider yourself superior to others.
ii) Never under-estimate other’s capabilities.
iii)Never humiliate others through harsh words.
iv) Never look down upon others.
v) Never fall a victim to ego. Do not assume credit for success, achievements and legacies for which you are not directly and legitimately responsible.
vi) Never be self-centred in matters of friendship. Never attribute motives to friendship or have motives of your own in befriending others.
vii) Be sincere, hardworking and genuine. Let the world know these qualities in your personality and character.
viii) Look and work for long-term goals.

If you follow these traits, you will certainly make a mark on your own. People will emulate your example, follow you and keep a track of your activities.
“Some are born great, some achieve greatness and some have greatness thrust on them,” said the Bard long, long ago. If you are born great or greatness is thrust on you, do not let it go to your head. Maintain your dignity and poise. Try and emulate some of the positive personality traits of great men. Follow them. This will make you humble and modest – a radically different person from what you might have been if you had let such greatness go to your head. This will also prevent you from flaunting a false ego and showing off.
If you achieve success and greatness on your own, do not forget your past. Remember your roots and the hurdles you have crossed in order to achieve your present status. But, at the same time, be confident to take on new challenges. Try to retain your present success while striving for greater heights. Such achievers are widely respected and held in high esteem. Such success will taste all the sweeter because you have achieved it on your own.

Jyothi S

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General Tips To Succeed In The Examinations

One of the most annoying things about examinations is that you have to take one often. Another, fact is that they refuse to go away. They linger in the form of exercises, tests, assignments and assessments (some English teacher must have looked up all the synonyms she should find) and you never seem to get rid of them. Rather like a bad cold. Common, too.
Studying is a full time job. It is important to keep up with the material throughout the year so that when the final approaches, it will be more like a comprehensive review than a monster memorizing session. Here are some tips to get you through:
When the exam is announced, you have some questions to get cleared first:
1. What is the syllabus or scope of the examination?
2. What kind of examination will it be: objective, short answers, essay type or a combination of all three?
There are several kinds of examinations and your teacher will know well ahead of time what types of questions will be asked.
Choose a method of preparation, which suits the type of examination you will be writing.

For problem solving
· Go through past homework assignments, lecture notes and your textbook. Then, Copy out problems.
· Mix them up.
· Solve as many problems as you can.
· Check your answers.
· For any you do not answer correctly, try to find similar problems and keep working on them.

For short answers
· Make a list of important terms.
· Write down the definition of each term as it was used in the course.
· Think of examples or illustrations of each term.
· Figure out the term or the concept’s relevance to the course.
· Be sure to write enough (questions are usually 4 -5 marks; figure on getting 1 or 2 marks for each significant point you make)
· Think MACRO – relate the terms to the general ideas presented in the course.
· Think MICRO – support your answer with examples.

For essay questions
· Review old essay type answers and assignments. Then select a number of topics that are central to the course, then,
· Write essay answers containing to the subject and main points.
· Write as many essay for each of these, giving yourself only as much time for each as you will have on the exam itself.
· Look over your trial essays, paying attention to areas that could be improved.
· Most essays are graded on information, organization and style.
· Once you have decided on one question, don’t change your mind.
· Write a strong introductory paragraph, which contains your subject, and 3 or 4 main points listed in the order in which you are going to write them.
· Start writing, the more you write the better; include as many references (names, dated, direct quotations) as possible.
· If there are more than one essay type question on the exam, leave a couple of pages after each so that you can add more if you have time.

For objective tests
· Study concepts and examples, as well as facts.
· Study your texts and notes by actively looking for the kind of material that can be answered objectively ( dates, names, precise details)
· Get old copies of multiple choice, exams. Look for patterns in questions and answers throughout certain disciplines.
· Always choose the “best” answer, this is often the answer that uses a word or phrase specific to the course or discipline.
· When in doubt, guess (unless there is a penalty for the wrong answer).

Exam study
· Prepare summary sheets for large amounts of lecture and textbook notes.
· Make review of final notes.
· Stress the following areas in your review : Points emphasized in class or in text
· Look at areas the professor has advised for study.
· Look at questions in study guide, past quizzes, and reviews at the end of textbook.
· Finally the anti-stress formula which is the most important if you want to crack the exam without any anxiety attacks…


THE ANTI- STRESS FORMULA: SQ4R

S = Survey the text to be covered on the exam, paying attention to the graphs, captions, and other visuals.
Q = Form questions of the material as you read each paragraph
R = Read the material thoroughly and try to answer the questions formed above.
R =Recite the main points of each section.
R = Reflect – think in new ways about the material read and relate this to the existing information.
R = Review the entire chapter.

Posted in Main. 1 Comment »

One Response to “Tips for students appearing for Exams”

  1. Manjusha Rohanekar Says:

    The article is very excellent ! Infinite stars to it .. It should reach to each and every student.

    manjusha


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